Glissandro 70
8

  • Glissandro 70
  • Constellation
  • 2006-03-06

This album is the result of collaboration over the last three years or so between Sandro Perri of Polmo Polpo and Craig Dunsmuir of Guitarkestra. Glissandro 70 were originally concieved only for a one-off weblog piece but then grew into a more substantial project with intermittent sessions and additions to make a corpus of full-length proportion.

Glissandro 70 is a five-track, fascinating journey through layered quitar picks building up with the additions of other instrumentation, samples, vocals and beats and creating intensely catchy rhythyms. Out of context the riffs seem often both folk and funk, but mulitplied, complex and interweaving as they become they are transformed into tribal trances and dancey washes of sound. There is a distinctive feel of almost new-wave dance or alt-disco but retaining this incredibly easy pop feel — with a listenable quality found in the music of Animal Collective, a reference point which is pertinent for both overall feel and specific style/content.

mulitplied, complex and interweaving as they become they are transformed into tribal trances and dancey washes of sound

The first half of the album starts with the almost math-folk “Something” a track which also has the feel of experimental early 1970s Pink Floyd pieces with its nature samples and background swirls. Second track “Analogue Shantytown” continues the form of layering and developing riffs and patterns but this time with vocal as the song title is filtered out through electonics and then shakily whispered out with a kind of rythmical jazz scat to start the track. As the guitars come in and the track move forwards it develops a distinct groove, which it rides out for minutes with various tribal and exotic-sounding vocals, and the scat whispers.

“Bolan Muppets” is a more minimal and reserved piece, clicking in and building up slowly, with interplaying melodic ‘la’s. About two-thirds of the way into the typically lengthy song (the average track length is about seven minutes) the song breaks down to a jazz-toned guitar accompanied by very fresh sounding vocals.

The second half of the album is made up of two tracks, “Portugal Rua Rua” and “End West”, both of which continue the overall feel of the album but offer some interesting vocal samples. “Portugal Rua Rua” starts off with rythmic vocal noise play, a sample of a chant from “No UFOs” by Model 500, and also contains probably the most straightforwad vocals on the album – set off nicely by the way that the music moves slowly from minimal melodics, through an effected, repeated guitar riff to a much more cacophanous territory — yet not harsh but still inkeeping with the general upbeat and really incredible pleasant mood of the album.

it’s got a fairly infectuous left-field party groove to it which makes it a winner

“End West” is a perfect album closer developing the tribal feel more using even more percussion than normal, which builds up over its longer thirteen minute length alongside the instrumentation and various chants and wails including a sample from “Pulled Up” by Talking Heads. Half way through it breaks down to just the percussion and chants and almost meanderingly moves through the manipulation of these and various electronics, still accompanied by the throbbing percussive heartbeats. The song then slowly pares itself down smaller and smaller until it just falls away.

Glissandro 70’s debut album references several things but is itself both distinctive and particular. It is fairly similar throughout and doesn’t go anywhere particularly crazy but it’s got a fairly infectuous left-field party groove to it which makes it a winner. It’s easy to listen to but offers nuances and intricasies for those who care to actually give it a real listen. So give it a real listen.

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